prospec

PFN1 Human

  • Name
  • Description
  • Pricings
  • Quantity
  • PFN1 Human
  • Profilin-1 Human Recombinant
  • Shipped with Ice Packs

Catalogue number

PRO-528

Synonyms

Profilin-1, Profilin I, PFN1.

Introduction

Profilin1 (PFN1) is a ubiquitous actin monomer-binding protein which is a member of the profilin family. PFN1 significantly boosts skin wound healing in-vitro and in-vivo which may be mediated by purinergic receptors. PFN1 is also active in endothelial cell migration and vessel sprouting. PFN1 is thought to control actin polymerization in response to extracellular signals. PFN1 binds to actin and affects the formation of the cytoskeleton. In addition, PFN1 has an important role in the regulation of epithelial cell-cell adhesion. At high concentrations, profilin averts the polymerization of actin, while at low concentrations it enhances the polymerization. PFN1 gene deletion is linked to Miller-Dieker syndrome.

Description

PFN1 Human Recombinant produced in E.Coli is a single, non-glycosylated, polypeptide chain containing 140 amino acids (1-140 a.a.) and having a molecular mass of 15kDa.
The PFN1 is purified by proprietary chromatographic techniques.

Source

Escherichia Coli.

Physical Appearance

Sterile Filtered colorless solution.

Formulation

The PFN1 protein solution contains 20mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH8.0) and 10% glycerol.

Stability

Store at 4°C if entire vial will be used within 2-4 weeks. Store, frozen at -20°C for longer periods of time.
For long term storage it is recommended to add a carrier protein (0.1% HSA or BSA).
Avoid multiple freeze-thaw cycles.

Purity

Greater than 95.0% as determined by SDS-PAGE.

Amino acid sequence

MAGWNAYIDN LMADGTCQDA AIVGYKDSPS VWAAVPGKTF VNITPAEVGV LVGKDRSSFY VNGLTLGGQK CSVIRDSLLQ DGEFSMDLRT KSTGGAPTFN VTVTKTDKTL VLLMGKEGVH GGLINKKCYE MASHLRRSQY.

Safety Data Sheet

Usage

ProSpec's products are furnished for LABORATORY RESEARCH USE ONLY. The product may not be used as drugs, agricultural or pesticidal products, food additives or household chemicals.
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